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U.S. Secretary of State Notes Importance of AUIS in Cairo Speech

During a speech in Cairo on January 10, United States Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo noted the role of American universities in the Middle East, including AUIS, as an example of the longstanding history of the U.S.’s relationship with countries in the region.   Speaking to an audience at the American University in Cairo on U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, Pompeo said, “It’s not a coincidence that many other American universities like this one thrive all across the Middle East, from Beirut to Sulaymaniyah.”   “These are symbols of America’s innate goodness, of our hopes for you, and of the better future we desire for all nations of the Middle East,” he continued.   The U.S. government has provided generous support to AUIS since its founding in 2007 through scholarships to students, the Access Program, and a $5 million student support grant in 2017. This support has provided opportunities for young people from across Iraq and its Kurdistan region to study at AUIS. The University’s cultural, ethnic, and religious diversity draws all of Iraq’s communities -- Arab, Kurdish, and Turkmen; Muslim, Christian, and Ezidi -- to live and study together.      Christine van den Toorn, Executive Director of External Relations and Policy, who is responsible for U.S. government relations, stated: “AUIS is grateful for the support from the U.S. government, which enables...

Professor Lynn Rose published in Oxford Companion to Disability History

The Center for Gender and Development Studies is pleased to announce the recent publication of "The Construct of Disability in Ancient Greece and Rome” by Dr. Lynn Rose, Professor in the Social Sciencesat American University of Iraq, Sulaimani (AUIS). The article, co-authored with C. F. Goodey, appears in the Oxford Companion to Disability History, ed. M. Rembis, C. Kudlick, and S. Burch (Oxford University Press, 2018).  Dr. Rose said, "The article seeks to dispel the notion of disability as a static concept. Physical, mental, and learning disabilities vary over time and from one culture to the next. In ancient Greece and Rome, the meaning of what we today would call a 'disability' was shaped by one's socio-economic status, not to the configuration of the characteristic."...

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