AUIS Offers Intensive Winter Term Courses to Undergraduate Students

Sulaimani, Iraq – January 30, 2013 – The American University of Iraq, Sulaimani (AUIS) offered its first winter session courses this month.  These specially-designed, intensive courses, which took place during the break between AUIS’ Fall and Spring terms, aimed to give students the opportunity to explore new subjects and pick up required credits so as to take fewer classes during their senior year.

Sulaimani, Iraq – January 30, 2013 – The American University of Iraq, Sulaimani (AUIS) offered its first winter session courses this month.  These specially-designed, intensive courses, which took place during the break between AUIS’ Fall and Spring terms, aimed to give students the opportunity to explore new subjects and pick up required credits so as to take fewer classes during their senior year.

Introduction to Psychology, taught by Geoffrey Gresk, introduced students to the field of Psychology. Via lectures, discussions, and activities, students familiarized themselves with psychological concepts and applied them to their own lives. Attention was paid to various subjects, including sociobiology, perception, personality, health & stress, and social psychology.

“The information was very useful and much related to our daily lives. I enjoyed it a lot, and if the university offers another Psychology class, I will definitely take it,” said Zainab Mahmood, an engineering major at AUIS.

Physical Computing and Robotics, taught by Dr. Hemin Latif, introduced students to the world of programming and the fundamentals of sensing and controlling the physical world with computers. According to Latif, the course encouraged students to think beyond the common stereotype for computers. The students got to see the results of their computer programs through tangible outcomes, such as lights turning on or motors spinning. The course was so popular that it may be offered again during the summer term.

The Political Economy of Petro-states, taught by Bilal Wahab, introduced students to the petroleum industry and political economy of countries endowed with petroleum resources. Moreover, it analyzed the structure and behavior of countries whose economies depend on petroleum exports. Special attention was given to the Iraqi and KRG petroleum policies and industries.

Wahab brought in a number of guest speakers, such as Qubad Talabani, the former Kurdistan Regional Government’s representative in the United States, Brad Camp, owner of DARB Global, and Jotiar Ziad, Corporate Social Responsibility Project Leader for Western Zagros.

“The class was quite intense, but due to the manageable number of students, there was a great deal of back and forth communication between students,” said Soma Faraj.

Sustainability of Emerging Markets, taught by Rachel Laribee, used case studies, data analysis, and historical and economic overviews of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) to present a comprehensive review of the challenges faced by emerging markets. Readings focused on the three components of economic sustainability: economic growth, social equity, and environmental protection.

From Empires to Nations, taught by renowned international scholar Gerard Chaliand, addressed Muslim expansion, European empires, revolutions, guerilla warfare, the terrorist phenomenon in the Middle East, and the future of global strategy. The course showed how each topic relates to and influences each other – leading ultimately to the present time.

About the American University of Iraq, Sulaimani 

AUIS is Iraq’s only non-profit institution for public benefit.  The mission of the university is to provide advanced academic programs at international standards of quality in higher education for the professions and general education.  Academic programs, taught in the English language by international faculty members, are designed to meet or exceed accreditation standards set by regional accreditation organizations in the United States. 

It is the objective of the University to produce graduates of responsible character with the necessary knowledge and skills for professional and national leadership.  Students are prepared for successful careers in a modern, democratic, pluralistic society and in a global environment.  The educational program of the university is designed to develop strength in critical thinking, the ability to communicate well, a strong work ethic, good citizenship and personal integrity.  Broad-based education, rooted in the American liberal arts tradition, as well as skill development is achieved at the University through teaching excellence, quality scholarship, and caring student services.

The core values of the university are freedom and responsibility, democracy, free expression and inquiry, equal opportunity, individual rights, tolerance, and honorable personal and professional behavior.  These values apply equally to all members of the university community, including students, faculty and staff members, administrators, persons invited to participate at the university, and members of the board of trustees and advisory bodies.  The university is, by design, an institution that is non-governmental, non-partisan, nonsectarian, independent, not-for-profit, and guided by the highest ethical standards.  It is committed to integrity and the rule of law in all of its dealings with public officials and private interests.  Academic freedom is a principle guaranteed in teaching, learning, and research in a manner identical to that found at regionally accredited colleges and universities in the United States. The university does not discriminate on the basis of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, occupation, politics, economic standing, or any other common human demographic factor in its admission of students or administration of the University or its policies.